The history of the Styx River is closely related to the formation of the Canterbury Plains.  In earlier times the flow of the Styx River would have been provided by a combination of spring water and channels connecting with the Waimakariri River. There is a strip of very young soils along the middle reaches of the Styx River and Smacks Creek that suggest a recent connection between the two river systems.

Today the Styx River  consists of a low-gradient, narrow, meandering, single-thread channel that is incised into a fan surface largely formed by sedimentation from the Waimakariri River. The springs that feed the Styx River ecosystem mainly occur along a line that is close to the western limit of the surface confining layer of fine-grained sediment overlying gravel, and probably indicate the presence of gravel channels within the Springston or Christchurch Formation.

 Water quality monitoring site on Kaputone Creek at Ouruhia Domain 
Photographer   Victor Brown 
Date  Unknown  © Styx Living Laboratory Trust
Kaputone Creek
© Styx Living Laboratory Trust

Water quality monitoring site on Kaputone Creek at Ouruhia Domain

Photographer  Victor Brown
Date Unknown

11, June 2009
 This spring is located adjacent to the Styx River just downstream from the railway line. 
Photographer  Jens Zollhoefer 
Date  Unknown 
  
© Christchurch City Council
Redwood Spring
© Christchurch City Council

This spring is located adjacent to the Styx River just downstream from the railway line.

Photographer Jens Zollhoefer
Date Unknown

 

06, July 2009